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in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on the supreme court. she will be delivering the oath of office to the vice president. this is beyonce coming in now and we will be hearing from her. there are several musical performances today. after the vice president is sworn in, james taylor will be singing "america the beautiful." then following that, john roberts, jr., the chief justice of the united states will administer the oath of office to the president. we just saw 88-year-old jimmy carter arriving on the scene. former presidents are almost always in attendance at these events, but today, george herbert walker bush and his son, george w. bush are not in attendance. the elder mr. bush has recently been released from a month-long stay in the hospital due to a respiratory ailment and so both bush families announced that they would not be able to attend because of the poor health of the eld
become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as a result of legalized abortion in the last four decades. 55 million. this makes up about a fix of our current adulation in the united states of america. even the center for disease control and prevention reported that about one in five people are not allowed to live annually in the united states because of abortion. abortion truly is the human rights abuse of today. [applause] and abortion is not good for women. experience, science, and research continue to show what common sense already tells us. abortion takes the life of a baby and wounds its mother and father. it is a somber moment. and yet, i believe that we are seeing s
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on those days? even your worst sermon would sound good. >> you described the president as relieved. i t
obama, "the bridge," talks about how he grew out of the civil rights movement, led by martin luther king. you write in the book, david, that race has been at the core of president obama's story. but it's not been in the foreground of his presidency. >> that's true. he's gotten some criticism for that from some bloack leaders. he views his presence in the white house is essential. and everything he can do, whether it's improving the economy or keeping the united states safe, improves the lives of all americans. he's very wary of being the president of black america. he's insistent on being the president of the united states. and sometimes, that's caused him difficulty with certain black leaders. cornell west is one. there's others. >> and you said the president blames his americanism. what did you mean by that? >> president obama is very clear, he has the opportunity to represent all of america. he realizes that that history helps him lead the entire country. and so, he's claimed his america is not simply as black america. >> i was just going to say. this is also the 150th anniversary her
. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are with us. if we could spin the camera over here a little bit you can see the east front of the capitol the president will join the motorcade coming out of the driveway from the east front to the constitution avenue. this will be in the next hour and a half to two hours. the parade is 1.5 mile long including a mix of civilian and military contributions, mostly marching bands and a lost floats that will be brought in from the civilian side of things something implemented in 1841 by william henry harrison. you will know he liked to do things big. he had the longist inaugural address of anyone at two hours in horrible weather and he did not wear a hat or cold and he died 30 days later but he had floats in the parade. there are 2,100 members
wrong about women getting the right to vote, and wrong about civil rights, wrong about vietnam, wrong about weapons of mass destruction in iraq. after being wrong about that, and that is just the tip, after being wrong about that, conservatives would have some self doubt about some things. but hard headedness is what makes them conservatives. it is what makes bill o'reilly bill o'reilly. bill o'reilly and his reaction to the inaugural address and his criticism of the inaugural address is in the rewrite tonight. that is coming up. hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day 50+. >>> the court said in a 7 to 2 decision that in the first three months of pregnancy, only the woman and her physician may decide whet
the right to vote, and wrong about civil rights, wrong about vietnam, wrong about weapons of mass destruction in iraq. after being wrong about that, and that is just the tip, after being wrong about that, conservatives would have some self doubt about some things. but hard headedness is what makes them conservatives. it is what makes bill o'reilly bill o'reilly. bill o'reilly and his reaction to the inaugural address and his criticism of the inaugural address is in the rewrite tonight. that is coming up. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. . >>> the court said in a 7 to 2 decision that in the first three months of pregnancy, only the woman and her physician may decide whether or not she may have an abortion. >> it me
condemning homosexuality. myrlie evers-williams, widow of murdered civil rights leader medgar evers, will deliver the invocation and the brooklyn tabernacle choir will sing. >>> this week, many religious groups praised president obama's newly announced measures to try to reduce gun violence, particularly his call for mandatory background checks and a ban on assault weapons. vice-president biden said the nation has a "moral obligation" to prevent future tragedies like the school shooting in connecticut. at a press conference in washington, members of an interfaith coalition reiterated support for stronger gun control, saying they agree that it is a "moral imperative." >> we stand together because we know beyond all else that god is love. let us love one another, bind ourselves together and challenge the onslaught of violence in our nation. >>> also this week, christian groups ramped up their push for immigration reform. at a media event in washington, speakers sat at a table with empty chairs meant to represent deported family members of immigrants living here. meanwhile, evangelical
to the left. >> as a civil rights issue of. >> that's right. he talked about global climate change and how we will attack that. immigration reform. by the way, there is jay-z and beyonce. >> by the way, she looks fantastic. >> moving on quickly. she is an incredibly beautiful woman. megyn: i defended him when he said it as well. [laughter] [talking over each other] >> i was just saying that i think both of you have points well taken. pillars in the eyes of the democrats and liberals of the american social progress in american society. he was also advancing some items which were not well established one can say he's the president, he got elected, he's got a mandate. but he wasn't saying that he was going to meet republican pathway. >> the president and the vice president with the official signing. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> thank you very much. [applause] megyn: we received about a dozen e-mails from our folks and viewers elaborating on what the crypt area is. it is called that because george washington was supposed to be buried there. but he was not because his fa
about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: as the president made his exit, a pause turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> reporter: they look like so many american families do when they take in a parade. and we learned the family of the late dr. martin luther king asked the president and the chief justice sign the king family bible after the swearing in. and they did. david muir, abc news, washington. >> incredible moment when he looks back. what a scene that must be. almost a million people out there. >> i would want to take a second look as well. i want to look at you. let me get your better side. all right, okay. >>> so the inaugural observances aren't over, even at this late hour. >> our coverage continues now with abc's brandi hitt live in washington. brandi, after some glitzy galas, there are more events set for later today. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, rob. good morning, paula. that's right, the
be there -- >> 70s? >> king would be there with all the other civil rights leaders who are in that moment. >> getting back to what you were saying, rachel, about the corporate profits, you know, the president believes in wall street. he doesn't want to be alien to wall street. he believes it is a vital part of our capitolistic system. he believes that government has a responsibility not to leave people behind and he also believes that those who have enjoyed the fruits out of our system should pay their fair share. and defining that fair share is going to be done by the population and the mood of the country and what we can do as a country to fix our finances. but he has been an allie to wall street. and he has tried to develop friends on wall street, which has been extremely hard for him, but if he can get these corporations to loosen up their profits and to hire people, then a lot of things would turn around in a heartbeat in this country. getting companies to invest here is one of his priorities. >> there's former president jimmy carter and his wife. immediately before them, as you migh
, avery friedman, civil rights attorney and law professor in cleveland and richard herman, new york criminal defense attorney and law professor joins us from miami this week. let's start with the class action lawsuits being filed against the subway restaurant chain. this is an ireport photo of one of the many that turned up around the world and the internet showing subway sandwiches that don't measure up to the company's foot-long claim. subway won't comment on pending legal action but did release this statement -- "for 47 years customer satisfaction has been our top priority. we regret any instance where we did not full fully deliver on our promise to customers." richard, how big a deal is this? >> miguel, does size really matter? does it really matter? does that half an inch or an inch really matter? >> it matters to somebody. attorneys out there. >> to somebody, that's right. >> it seems to matter. that foot-long, all those commercials with the song, well, they're not a foot long. they're 11 inches long or 11 1/2 inches long. it's not like mcdonald's who says, look, i got a quart
. >> absolutely. the civil rights movement created the possibility for barack obama to become president and i think he's ever mindful of that. i think that's where that community organizing comes in him. he knows that communities create the power. you think about the gay rights movement, the civil rights movement, the women's movement, this is all part of who he is and i think it's part of american history. when i look at american history, those movements are critical in transforming our attitudes about ourselves and about one another. and that's where real change takes place. lincoln said, you control public sentiment, controls everything. even if they can't control my voice. >> sometimes when historians try to speak too much in the course of one inaugural weekend, this is what happens. we're going to allow doris rest her voice for a second. you saw when we were talking a motorcade and you'd be forgiven for thinking there's the president on the move from the white house. it was not. first of all, you can't swing a dead cat without hit ago motorcade this weekend in washington. that was just t
's the critical part of it, right? when they dig in with their civil lawsuit they unearth more stuff as we found out today in the morgan stanley case. why didn't the government dig in? and let me pause at a theory for you and get your reaction to it. one, these guys give a tremendous amount of money to politicians. dick durban said frankly they own the place and he's the second more senior senator for the democrats in the senate. and they're all in the same circle. attorney general eric holder doesn't think waaaa i'm going to do deals that's my friend bob. i just represented him the other day. i'm not going to put bob in jail. >> there are a lot of political appointees. here eric holder and then lanny brewer chief of the criminal division of justice the man who sits at the crux of all this. there are a lot of justice attorneys who would love nothing more than to bring down a major banger, a major wall street player put a notch on their belt. that's a counter veiling to reality. you say without support from above it's hard for them to act and i think that's very likely true. on the other hand i t
is obviously history. >> there is a strong theme of civil rights. >> america's possibilities are limitless. it is now our generation's task to carry on. >> this speech was about an action plan. >> we cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or treat name-calling as debate. we must act. >> things will get back to what we see as normal. >> today is a day to celebrate the democracy. >> my fellow americans, we are made for this moment. and we will seize it so long as we seize it together. >> for the first time in recent history, today a giant event in washington ran a few minutes early. and ten minutes before noon, chief justice john roberts administered the oath of office to the president, and he delivered the second inaugural address which lasted just over 18 minutes. >> for our journeys are not complete until our wives and mothers and daughters can earn a living equal to their efforts. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal, as we
. and a lot of journalists who were too young to cover the civil rights stories of the 60's, they weren't going to miss out on helping to shape history twice. so, they covered him the way they covered him. you know, by slobbering all over him. other historic figure. she could be the first woman president of the united states. this week, after those hearings, the media began slobbering in urgent. it will continue ratchet up when she announces she is running as president of the united states. you know what, bill? you it doesn't matter what you think about this. it doesn't matter what i think about. this it doesn't matter what krauthammer thinks about it. it doesn't matter what brit hume thinks about it. it doesn't matter what anybody thinks about it. because these people, these journalists were born without the embarrassment. nothing embarrasses them about how they behave. >> do you think that brian williams and and the rest of them, diane sawyer, martha raddatz, do you think that they know how they sounded while introducing a very important story, secretary of state's testimony in front
, but -- >> look at all the changes people said couldn't happen. civil rights, women's rights, don't ask don't tell. sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> let us come together from across in nation, reinstate the assault weapons ban. [ applause ] >> reporter: speakers called for limiting the size of ammunition clips and for requiring background checks for all gun sales. after the massacre at sandy hook elementary school, d.c.'s congressional delegate said the onus is now on ordinary citizens to get involved. >> no more moaning. it's time to do something about it. [ applause ] >> reporter: in the crowd there were a few people who opposed restricting assault weapons or ammunition magazines or requiring background checks for all gun purchases. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> reporter: what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys who commit the crimes. >> reporter: a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house for the success of the administration's to control guns. arnie duncan reminded participants it wil
is not through. apologies. >> civil rights leader, merl the e evers who committedded her life to extend our nation's founding principles. mrs. evers will lead us in the invocation. shepard: she is the naacp's mississippi field secretary in 1963 when he was gunned down in the driveway of his jackson, mississippi home, and she carries forward his legacy. merle evers williams. >> america, we are higher here. our nation's capitol. on this day, january the 21st, 2013, the inauguration of our 45th president, barack obama. we come at this time to ask blessings upon our leaders. the president, vice president, members of congress, all elected and appointed officials of the united states of america. we are here to ask blessings upon our armed forces. blessings upon all who contribute to the essence of the american spirit, the american dream. the opportunity to become whatever our mankind, womankind allows us to be. this is the promise of america. as we sing the words of belief, this is my country, let us act upon the meaning that everyone is included. may the inherent dignity and inalienable rights o
the pick of every darn civilization on the planet. >> right, pick work dogs, not lazy dogs from those donor countries. congressman king said later his remarks were meant as a compliment. charming. so there has been an evolution by the republican party and it's not because rick perry accused anyone of not having a heart. senator mccain, how about some of that famous straight talk? >> i'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. >> now, losing dramatically. i'm not so sure about that. mitt romney only lost by 44 points among latino voters, a hair's breath really. if republicans think the latino vote should be theirs, they may want to revisit their hardline party platform which reads in part, we oppose any form of amnesty for those who, by intentionally violating the law, disadvantaged those who have obeyed it, granting amnesty only rewards and encourageags more l breaking. there is no indication that the republican base is on board with any of th
couldn't happen. civil rights, womens rights, don't ask don't tell, sometimes quickly, sometimes slowly. change will happen when we work for it as a country. >> this will not work or make a difference. >> what will make a difference? >> prosecute guys that commit crimes. >> a minister asked the crowd to pray in the direction of the white house to wish the obama administration success in passing tighter gun control laws. >> tens of thousands of protestors took to the streets of san francisco for the anniversary of legalizing abortion. pro-life protestors marched down market street from the civic center to justin herman plaza demanding roe v wade be turned over. a law student who testified before congress about contraception was a guest speaker. >> there is a more profound sight about access. about affordability and insurance coverage and making sure people especially in rural areas have access. >> i would like to see everyone question abortion more. they say it should be legal and safe they don't talk about rare. >> as many as 40,000 people attended the pro-life rally. it's the biggest a
life, but to me it is my human right, my civil right to decide what medicines i take, to be able to consult with my doctor and decide what medical procedures are appropriate for me, for my body or my family. we've seen some of the most outrageous measures at the state level, even here at the federal level after trying to convince us there was no war on women last year. what was some of the first legislation we saw being put forward? defunding planned parenthood. they're trying to go back to that again. not to mention these personhood amendments. and i think part of the challenge here for the pro-choice movement and i think part of what we saw last year is women around this country and men as well because we always saw that in key battleground states this is a top voting issue for women. naral did a poll during the election and found this. i think women and men are understanding this is about our human rights, this is about our rights to control our destiny, but there's also an element of health care to this. we've got the president's health care bill being implemented, preventati
. whether it's civil rights for african-americans or equality for women, or equality for the lgtb community. >> oh, my. he takes on the world and the internet in his new ebook, and he's going to join me live in the studio. you don't want to miss it. progresso this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just have to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more... [ midwestern/chicago accent ] cheddar! yeah! 50 percent more [yodeling] yodel-ay-ee-oo. 50% more flash. [ southern accent ] 50 percent more taters. that's where tots come from. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase plus a 50% annual bonus on the cash you earn. it's the card for people who like more cash. 50% more spy stuff. what's in your wallet? this car is too small. yeah. t
by force. so how dangerous are its threats? and why is the country's largest civil rights organization fighting new york's efforts to crack down on supersized soft drinks? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." american men and women already are fighting and dying together overseas. the defense secretary leon panetta said today it's time for the military to recognize that reality. so the pentagon has ended its long-time policy of barring women from combat. critics question whether women can handle the grueling, physical tasks that come with those roles. chris lawrence has been looking into this for us. what's the latest, wolf? >> when it comes to integrating women, forget about privacy concerns. sleeping in close quarters, separate bathrooms, never mind that. it's strength and stamina. with a stroke of his pen, defense secretary leon panetta altered the look of the american sword. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> panetta officially open
in the civil rights movement has died. vern nonnathaniel dobson. in the early 1960's, reverend dobson committed his life to social justice and equality. he was a major figure in the faith community for four decades. we got a chance to speak to 96-year-old anne miller who worked with reverend dobson to start the maryland food bank. we asked her what she remembers about him. >> he did something. he didn't just wring his hands and say, it's terrible. he knew something could be done about it, and he did it. >> mayor stephanie rawlings-blake said we must give thanks to reverend dobson for his honesty and perseverance in the face of racism and cruelty. another released a statement saying i am proud to call him friend and his death is a loss for anyone who cares about equal for all. >> and gun rights supporters are finding ways to demonstrate their passions over the gun control issue. more from washington. >> thousands of demonstrators joined a quiet march through the streets of washington to send a message to washington about gun violence. among those in attendance, about 100 parents from newtown,
history. the pioneers went over the rocky mountains. we got through world war ii. we did the civil rights movement. they did it, not we. i mean we that's the whole point. the civil rights movement the gay rights movement the womens movement came from below and leaders responded. it's never coming from the top down. usually change comes from the bottom up. that's where the we is. >> lincoln's second inaugural address was something like 701 words or something. i believe he used the word "i" once in the speech. so could a president these days give a 700-word inaugural address? please? >> we would love it. that means you have to have that poetic compression. linkeningen linkcoln was a writer that knew how to make these things little. we would have to talk more. oh my god. >> doris, let me ask you a question. i want to follow up on this but i want to make sure it's a fair thing to ask. that's the great they think about "morning joe." >> uh-oh. here he goes. >> the great thing about "morning joe" is -- >> what are you doing? >> we fly without -- >> are you thinking? >> we ign
. housing, they are discriminated against. a lot is almost a civil rights issue. it is a human rights issue. i am hoping integration helps that. families are torn apart by it. i am fortunate to have had a very fortunate family. the stress and strain economically will bust up families. you are right on it. think -- thank you for your acknowledgement. >> i think it is interesting families would not hesitate to get a family matter cannot -- family member help for appendicitis or any other problem but often have a difficult time reaching out to get the behavioral health and the substance seized disorder treatment they need. the bottom line is it is often seen that you have a character problem or a bad mom or dad or something along those lines, rather than, for many people, if they have a brain disease. there is a lot of education still to come and a lot of support we need at several levels for people to be able to move forward and raise their hand and come out and get help. i can also say we need to stick our head up and be proud of the fact that the area of health care we provide care in and w
engagement is the essential in protecting our citizens from harm, against civil-rights violations and combating guns, gangss and drugs through violence that steel too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is that we are up against not only because you hear the alarming statistics in news stories but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize as i do -- all right? most importantly you recognize as i do that no public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need and secure the result our communities deserve on our own. that is particularly true about gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every count represented here and about which many of you have been passionate advocates. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room have joined with those of us in the justice department who support what enforcement and strengthen anti violence initiatives especially in recent years as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horse events i
. when you take away people's civil rights or say no to them you're not with them. if you're in a country club of 100 white men and they start dying off, your base is dead. the republican party, michael is right. he tried to do that when he was the chairman. you have to expand your base. only way to do that is to get out of people's houses, to get out of their bed rooms. to leave them alone. and have basically a society which is fair and equitable. don't forget mitt romney talked about the 47%. that is not the way to go about it. they have to look for it. >> last thing you hear, michael. you and i have had these conversations your relationship with the rnc. republican and out there fighting for what you believe in do you see this as i mean for the first time in awhile maybe a good chance and maybe just the drumming in the election with the president winning re-election. do you think republicans are starting? are you seeing signs that maybe it's hopeful in your opinion they're starting to change some of those stances and things you pushed and fought for? this is a hopeful thing for a repub
know, we can't help but remember the civil rights movement and really we don't need another george wallace copycat. i think what we hear is someone that says, i don't want to obey these laws because i don't agree with them and that's not really his role. his role is the sheriff and it's to enforce the law. he doesn't get to decide what's constitutional and what's not. >> he told me he would, if, of course, there are no federal gun control laws passed just yet, but if there are, he says he will go to the attorney general and discuss with him whether it's constitutional and then he will make a decision. but i think in the end he kind of said, well, i'm going to uphold the law. do you believe him? >> well, i think this might be some level of sort of political grandstanding. i think, you know, he probably made these statements to play to the tea party base but i think there's a reality that, you know, any judge would force him to uphold the law and, you know, any judge would sort of advise him to follow the law. i don't think anyone is going to say, go ahead and balk federal law just b
time is to put the past behind us. let's march arm in arm with the new civil rights movement to say that we as a nation can all stand for the beautiful gift of life. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? >> thank you, mr. speaker. i send to the desk a privileged report from the committee on rules for filing under the rule. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title. the clerk: report to accompany house resolution 39, resolution providing for consideration of the bill h.r. 325, to ensure the complete and timely payment of the obligations of the united states government until may 19, 2013, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: referred to the house calendar and ordered printed. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. sessions: mr. speaker, i move that the house do now adjourn. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on the motion to adjourn. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the motion is adopted. accordingly, the house stands it's just --
rights and environment. that's a huge take away. the third particular away his lecturing about the need for civility. and that's after the nastyiest race in politics. the media didn't point that out. stuart: this fawning acceptance of everything the president had to say yesterday, the media is the not pointing out financial peril. this is a financial program, you know that. we follow the money. if i follow the money trail down the road and we need to pay for the entitlements and spending and taxation coming at us, we have a slow economy, and a dangerous escalation in our debt. and i don't think the media is doing its job because nobody is saying it. >> they were too busy gushing, that's the problem. al roker frantically waving from the sidelines and wolf blitzer frantically trying to get his attention. this isn't reporting, serious journalism or a look at the issues of the day. they were attacking george bush for the cost of his inaugural before the inauguration, they were attacking him. there's no serious coverage of this man. the media are his absolute pompon wavers in this administra
footsie games. you can't have it both ways. >> what is the right thing? >> you have to come up with a settlement. colorado law won't tell a catholic institution you can't settle. what they can't do is to hide under the cloak of civil law, and say i'm sorry, we're still pro life, but you know what? you're not really a person when you are a fetus, because we're just hiding under colorado civil law. if that's the case, then they made a mockery of catholic teaching and they should be stripped of their catholicism. >> you look at hospitals, it kind of contradicts that. when you look at the law, when it's contraception, that's one thing. but this is the law, and so i find this one a conundrum. >> the catholic church is always fighting laws. we're fighting against governor cuomo who wants to bring in nonphysicians to treat women who want abortions. the catholic church takes its dictates from natural law. as far as i'm concerned, it's not as difficult as some people may want to make it out to be not a whole lot of wiggle room if you are truly catholic. >> a catholic hospital has been s
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